By: Nina Barrett

When I tell people I did the Whole30 diet this summer, I get a mix of responses that usually vary from “What? How?” to “Why?” The Whole30, for those of you who don’t know, is a 30-day challenge designed to eliminate the most common inflammatory foods from your diet, along with other foods that disrupt blood sugar levels and cause cravings. There is some overlap with the paleo diet, but it is a little bit stricter, as Whole30 is not designed to be a lifestyle. The eliminated foods include grains, dairy, added sugar, baked goods, legumes, and alcohol. Obviously, it was a challenge—you’re basically removing everything good from life—but at the end of it all, I was sleeping better, had much more energy, and felt healthier than I had before I started. I finished the diet in August, but have decided to try and keep up with some of the rules of the program.

At home, it was really easy to meal prep and take time to make Whole30 compliant dishes, but coming back to school proved more challenging. College students don’t exactly have much time to plan and prep meals for the entire week, nor the money to spend on Whole30-compliant ingredients for every meal. However, it’s not impossible to follow the Whole30 most days, and can actually be achieved with meals that are both cheap and easy to make! Here are a few of my favorite recipes:

Breakfast: Scrambled eggs with onions and peppers

  1. Crack and whisk three eggs and add to a pan
  2. Once they start to cook, add a handful of chopped onions and red bell pepper
  3. Finish cooking and add salt and pepper to taste

Lunch: Salad with grilled chicken

  1. Season chicken with salt, pepper, and a squeeze of lemon
  2. Cook on saucepan until cooked through
  3. Add salad mix to bowl (I usually use romaine lettuce and spinach)
  4. Slice chicken and toss with salad mix
  5. Add Primal Kitchen Ranch Dressing

Dinner: Chicken with Onions, Peppers and Avocado

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  1. Season chicken with salt, pepper, and a squeeze of lemon
  2. Cook on saucepan until cooked through
  3. While cooking, toss chopped onions and green and red bell peppers into the pan with a splash of extra-virgin olive oil, sautéing until the onions are lightly browned.
  4. Cut half an avocado, sprinkle with salt, and serve with chicken and veggies

Snacks: (Whole30 technically discourages snacking, but by the time it hits 4 PM, I usually need something to get me through the day.)

  1. Sliced apple with 2 tbsp. of Justin’s almond butter
  2. Handful of almonds
  3. Bowl of strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries
  4. RX Bar (avoid the peanut butter ones)

Whole30 is all about a balance, especially of proteins and healthy fats, so you should never be starving throughout the day. Grilled vegetables and proteins are the backbones of this program, so check out Trader Joe’s for great deals on produce or support local farmers by buying from the Georgetown Farmers’ Market! The Whole30 is a challenging diet (especially when you’re trying not to drink those Saturday night Natty’s), but integrating certain aspects into your life can prove quite beneficial. Whether you are looking to feel more energized, learn more about the food you are putting into your body, or just keep off that Freshman 15, Whole30 may just be the regimen for you.

 

NINA BARRETT is a junior in the College, studying Government and English. You can find her spending way too much time in the Yates pool or complaining about the lack of açai bowls on campus. In her free time, she enjoys watching Parks and Rec, searching for the perfect iced vanilla latte, and reading surprisingly accurate astrology memes.
Posted by:Thirty Seventh

Georgetown's premier fashion and lifestyle blog.

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